Travel & Nature

By on May 15th, 2008

For the last three years, the US Department of Interior has been dragging its feet when it comes to protecting the polar bear. It has now finally listed the polar bear as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. This might seem like a victory but there are enough exemptions in this listing to leave the polar bear unprotected against its biggest threat, global warming.

What happened?

After months of calculated delays and several lawsuits against them, brought by Greenpeace, the Natural Resources Defence Council and the Center for Biological Diversity, the Bush administration has listed the polar bear as threatened under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA).
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By on May 15th, 2008

A large quantity of nitrogen compounds emitted into the atmosphere by humans through the burning of fossil fuels and the use of nitrogen fertilizers enters the oceans and may lead to the removal of some carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, concluded a team of international scientists led by Texas A&M University Distinguished Professor of Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences Robert Duce.

The team of 30 experts from institutions around the world presented its conclusions in the current issue of the journal Science.

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By on May 13th, 2008

Have you noticed anyone doing rooftop camping, rappelling from downtown buildings or commuting to work via canoe? It’s all part of an inner-city campaign to announce The Big Wild.

Protecting our heritage
This new social movement founded by the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) and Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC) wants to advance large-scale wilderness protection in Canada.

“The Big Wild movement is a new way for everyone who cares about our country’s wilderness to voice their support for protecting it. We are encouraging every citizen to participate in this new vehicle that promotes leadership in wilderness conservation. Through The Big Wild we want Canadians to create a collective voice that is so strong, that we can convince our country’s leaders — at all levels — to make a difference that will ultimately have global impact,” said David Labistour, CEO of Mountain Equipment Co-op.

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By on May 7th, 2008

Peruvian authorities move quickly to contain 1,500 gallons of fuel that spilled from a U.S. tanker in Pisco.

The Peruvian city of Pisco is in the country’s Ica Region. The oil spill happened some 38 kilometers from the region’s Paracas National Reserve, home to a rich concentration of sea and bird life.

Michelle Carlile-Alkhouri reports.

By on May 7th, 2008

Peruvian authorities move quickly to contain 1,500 gallons of fuel that spilled from a

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U.S. tanker in Pisco.

The Peruvian city of Pisco is in the country’s Ica Region. The oil spill happened some 38 kilometers from the region’s Paracas National Reserve, home to a rich concentration of sea and bird life.

Michelle Carlile-Alkhouri reports.

By on May 7th, 2008

This came from Reuters and if you ask me, I say that the researcher from the University of Exeter in Britain who said this is full of Sh%$#. Oh yes!!! This research was a waste of money. Let’s keep polluting the air so that the forest stay alive. Ya right. The way I see it we got to stop polluting, and that includes stopping deforestation, to keep our green lands alive.

Here is

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that story:

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By on May 1st, 2008

OSLO (Reuters) – Global warming could gradually starve parts of the tropical oceans of oxygen, damaging fisheries and coastal economies, a study showed on Thursday.

Areas of the eastern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans with low amounts of dissolved oxygen have expanded in the past 50 years, apparently in line with rising temperatures, according to the scientists based in Germany and the United States.

And models of global warming indicate the trend will continue because oxygen in the air mixes less readily with warmer water. Large fish such as tuna or swordfish avoid, or are unable to survive, in regions starved of oxygen.

“Reduced oxygen levels may have dramatic consequences for ecosystems and coastal economies,” according to the scientists writing in the journal Science.

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By on April 28th, 2008

An estimated 150,000 baby turtles are hatched on the shores of the Rishikulya beach in India’s eastern Orissa state.

The stretch of beach is a favourite nesting ground for this particular breed of turtle – the Olive Ridley.

However, hatching is often fraught with danger. Many turtles die from suffocation under the sand or from being eaten by other animals. And if they do reach the sea they can often be killed by boat propellers, pollution or poachers, who hunt them for their meat. According to studies, only one out of every 1,000 hatchlings reach adulthood.

More recently though, conservationists have set up schemes to help safely deliver the babies to the sea.

Via: Reuters